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Sex differences in labor markets

David Neumark

London, New York Routledge, 2004 416 s. ISBN 0-415-70013-2
Bogomtale fra forlaget.

Sex differences abound in labor markets. In the United States three differences in particular have attracted the most attention: the earnings gap, occupational segregation, and the greater responsibility of women for child care and housework, and consequential lower participation in the labor market.
This volume brings together David Neumark's work of the past fifteen years: in it he tries to understand and analyze the relative importance of family economic decision-making and sex discrimination in generating sex differences in labor markets. Neumark's research covers three main levels of inquiry. The first studies non-discriminatory sources of sex differences in labor markets; the second grapples with the problem of sex discrimination; while the third evaluates policies to combat and reduce sex differences in labor markets.


Contents:
Part One: Family Economics and Sex Differences in Labor Markets

1. Korenman, Sanders D., and David Neumark. 1991. "Does Marriage Really Make Men More Productive?" Journal of Human Resources, Vol. 26, No. 2, Spring, pp. 282-307.
2. Korenman, Sanders D., and David Neumark. 1992. "Marriage, Motherhood, and Wages." Journal of Human Resources, Vol. 27, No. 2, Spring, pp. 233-55.
3. Neumark, David, and Sanders D. Korenman. 1994. "Sources of Bias in Women's Wage Equations: Results from Sibling Data." Journal of Human Resources, Vol. 29, No. 2, Spring, pp. 379-405.
4. Blackburn, McKinley, David E. Bloom, and David Neumark. 1993. "Fertility Timing, Wages, and Human Capital." Journal of Population Economics, Vol. 6, No. 1, February, pp. 1-30.
5. Neumark, David, and Andrew Postlewaite. 1998. "Relative Income Concerns and the Rise in Married Women's Employment." Journal of Public Economics, Vol. 70, No.1, October, pp. 157-83.
Part Two: Testing for Discrimination
6. Neumark, David. 1988. "Employers' Discriminatory Behavior and the Estimation of Wage Discrimination." Journal of Human Resources, Vol. 23, No. 3, Summer, pp. 279-95.
7. Neumark, David, and Michele McLennan. 1995. "Sex Discrimination and Women's Labor Market Outcomes." Journal of Human Resources, Vol. 30, No. 4, Fall, pp. 713-40.
8. Neumark, David. 1996. "Sex Discrimination in Hiring in the Restaurant Industry: An Audit Study." Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol. 106, No. 3, August, pp. 915-42.
9. Hellerstein, Judith K., David Neumark, and Kenneth Troske. 1999. "Wages, Productivity, and Worker Characteristics: Evidence from Plant-Level Production Functions and Wage Equations." Journal of Labor Economics, Vol. 17, No. 3, July, pp. 409-46.
Part Three: Testing Models of Discrimination
10. Neumark, David. 1999. "Labor Market Information and Wage Differentials by Race and Sex." Industrial Relations, Vol. 38, No. 3, July, pp. 414-45.
11. Hellerstein, Judith K., David Neumark, and Kenneth Troske. 2002. "Market Forces and Sex Discrimination." Journal of Human Resources, Vol. 37, No. 2, Spring, pp. 353-80.
Part Four: Evaluating Policy Responses to Discrimination
12. Bayard, Kimberly, Judith Hellerstein, David Neumark, and Kenneth Troske. "New Evidence on Sex Segregation and Sex Differences in Wages from Matched Employer-Employee Data." Forthcoming in Journal of Labor Economics.
13. Holzer, Harry, and David Neumark. 1999. "Are Affirmative Action Hires Less Qualified? Evidence From Employer-Employee Data on New Hires." Journal of Labor Economics, Vol. 17, No. 4, Part 2, October, pp. 534-69.
14. Holzer, Harry, and David Neumark. 2000. "What Does Affirmative Action Do?" Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Vol. 53, No. 2, January, pp. 240-71.